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The Battle For The Dashboard

Dashboard

 

November 2019

By: Steve Morelli 

InsuranceNewsNet Magazine

 

Ask Doug Massey why it has been so difficult to create seamless and effective insurance technology and he will take you on an Uber ride from hell — metaphorically speaking, of course

 

Massey knows all about the ride because his career has followed the route of insurance tech itself in the early 1990s, when he started a property and casualty quote engine company as a college student. Later, he worked with leading insurance tech companies such as Ebix.

 

Massey is now the executive vice president for sales and relationship management with Insurance Technologies, which, as the name implies, is a key player in insurance tech. And he said the company is finally closing in on a eureka moment when it all comes together into a seamless insurance tech nirvana.

 

But we are in an age when we can get dinner delivered by drone with a click of the thumb, so why is the life insurance and annuity industry’s tech seemingly stuck?

 

Ah, step inside Massey’s exasperating Uber for an explanation.

 

“Let’s assume I’m using my Uber app and I want to do a ride, but it’s the way insurance works,” Massey began. “I’ve got to open up my Google Maps or my Apple Maps. So, I’ve got to find my location. I have to set a pin for my location. Then I say, ‘OK, well I’ve set my pin for my location. Now I want to share that over to this Uber app.’”

Life Inforce Policy Management Automation

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November 2019

By: Ken Leibow 

Broker World Magazine

 

It’s finally here—online tools for life insurance agents and clients to do basic tasks like change beneficiaries, look up paid-to-date information, see account values, and address changes without having to fill out a form or call a customer service phone number. It’s no longer a one-off but being implemented by most life insurance carriers today. You are also now seeing Artificial Intelligence (AI) chat tools for clients to get the information on their policies or to answer basic insurance questions on demand. Readily available for agents is new technology leveraging Big Data Analytics to analyze a policy resulting in new sales opportunities with products that better fit your client’s needs.

 

Policy Review
As an agent, you should do a review with your client on their life insurance policies at least once a year. Policy review should also occur when there is a life changing event or a family’s situation has changed, which could result in the need to increase or decrease coverage. Interest crediting rates on certain policies are much lower today than when the policy was first purchased. This can affect the future performance of your client’s policy, which could result in having to pay additional premium dollars to meet your client’s needs. Because people are living longer or if your client’s health has improved, then they may need to make an adjustment on their policy. On permanent insurance like universal life policies, loans and withdrawals and other changes to the policy, like premiums not paid as planned, may have impacted the current performance. Of course, if premiums have increased then you should do a policy review with your client. If the client is an owner or co-owner of a business and that business has grown or changed, then that is a compelling reason to do a policy review. Occasionally a life insurance company’s ratings or financials have changed, which may no longer meet your client’s risk tolerance.

 

The objective of the policy review is to do a thorough analysis of current insurance holdings vs. current needs. There are also industry and product changes to consider as well. I would recommend to carefully look at older life policies because of the way life insurance is designed today—the current changes in pricing, and how it’s medically underwritten, may have a significant difference in 2019 compared to five, 10 or more years ago. Also, you need to be up to date on the current tax, business and estate law changes. Higher life expectancies (mortality tables), lower interest rates and dividend crediting rates affect performance. There are new products on the market today to consider like indexed universal life products. Look at your client’s goals: If their goals are the same, is there a better insurance product for them today? If their goals have changed, then what’s available today to best meet those financial needs? For living benefit needs there are linked benefit products to consider. Should your client consider a way to financially maximize a policy he no longer needs by looking at a life settlement option?

The Insurance Consumer Journey

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By Ken Leibow

 

Jornaya has taken Data Analytics to a new innovative level. “Jornaya Activate” is an application that enables more cost-effective target marketing by witnessing the behavior of the consumer online shopping experience. An example is a Life event whereby a consumer is shopping online for a new home loan or to refinance their current Mortgage. This will identify that the consumer will need more Life Insurance. A Carrier or Agency’s portfolio of customers can be better targeted with marketing campaigns with messages that will be more cost-effective in generating new sales opportunities.

 

Jornaya captures 200 million unique shopping events each month of which 5 million are life insurance related opportunities. This has increased 30% over 2018. Literally there are portfolios of millions of customers. There is NO personal identifiable information captured (PII). Privacy of these consumers is secured. The data criteria captured are focused on witnessing the behavior of consumers filling out online forms for shopping for insurance, mortgages and other activities across multiple websites that can be analyzed to determine specific insurance needs. Jornaya works with Multi-Line Insurance Carriers and Agencies including life insurance Direct Marketers like AccuQuote and eFinancial. I interviewed Jamie Pickles, GM of Insurance at Jornaya, for this article and he had a quote that sums it all up. “A predictive model is great, but facts are better”.

 

Jornaya Activate monitors a portfolio of prospects/customers for Major Life Purchase (MLP) in-market behavior by incorporating intelligence on behavior and measuring intent in Real Time, Jornaya’s innovative technology can Provide intelligence that could become a new sales opportunity for life insurance. If you are a marketer, the data captured will allow you to interact better with your customer and improve customer retention.

 

Download and Read the Report by Jornaya “Understanding the Insurance Consumer Journey” by clicking the button below.

Digital Insurance: Technologies and Strategies Driving Insurance into the Connected Age

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Mariana Dumont
Head of USA Operations
Insurance Nexus

 

The ability to accurately discern the past and predict the future based on nothing but data points and the experience of actuaries and adjusters has served the industry well up to now. Insurance is, after all, a multi-billion-dollar, truly global industry. While this remains the case, the landscape is now radically different to the past, thanks in part to the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT). The use of these technologies that collect, record and transmit live data has proliferated exponentially over the past decade, and for a data-reliant industry like insurance, the impact has already been profound.

 

They may already seem ubiquitous but estimates of how many IoT devices will connect our cars, homes, communities, medical services and work lives by the year 2020 range from 30 billion[i] to 50 billion[ii]. Whatever the precise number, this will generate (and already is) a huge amount of data to be analyzed and monetized.

 

This increase in the quality and quantity of available data is already producing some significant outcomes; the process of writing policies can now be far better informed by what is known about the risk level of an individual or entity, as opposed to simply what is known about the claims generated by an entire class of risk. Some carriers have already begun this transition; John Hancock, for example, announced in 2018 that all new life insurance policies must henceforth use digital fitness trackers to monitor policyholders[iii]. Using the high-quality, objective data derived from IoT, it is now possible to assess claims more accurately and efficiently, and in some cases, even prevent them from arising entirely.

 

“IoT is already enabling customers to avoid bad things happening to them. Some people call it prevention. I see it as empowerment of customers.” – Nick Ayrdon, Head of Strategy & Development at Aviva

 

In turn, this is changing how insurers interact with customers, both before and after a claim, with one executive predicting that that we are in fact “shifting from a claims-handling business to a claims prevention one”. As the value proposition of exchanging data for value becomes more concrete, it could become a strong pull-factor driving uptake of connected insurance products. And yet, already operating in an environment of squeezed profits, high regulation and low consumer trust, the industry is witnessing something of a perfect storm at present.

 

There is no question as to whether the global insurance industry is going to go digital, and most of the industry understands why it will. The real problem for most is how it should happen and creating an environment in which they can maximize the value of insurance technology. As Michael Lebor states, this is not simply a case of reorganizing a particular department or function: “In my opinion, IoT is not a product, it’s a paradigm shift, a completely different way for technologies to interact with each other. Devices are going to be talking to each other, there are going to be hubs, and we must leverage that throughout the entire lifecycle of our product, whether for distribution, or on-boarding customers, or using it for claims and first notice of claims. It’s not one product, it’s a holistic way of thinking.”

 

Any transformation of this nature will invariably lead to substantive changes in how insurance carriers operate internally and whereas digital insurance projects were generally siloed to innovation departments in the past, executives agree that is starting to change. While the survey found that only 14% of senior management teams were currently affected by the introduction of digital insurance, the most commonly cited reason was that initiatives had not yet reached the point where it had become necessary (the implication being that management will take a more active stance when projects have scaled sufficiently).

 

Similarly, American Family Business Development Manager, Shaun Wilson, suggests “until there are a lot of devices providing a lot of data about specific risks, the carrier is not going to have the insights about whether or not these devices mitigate risks to any level of significance. That’s the promise of this approach, but nobody has enough data yet to validate the hypothesis.” As carriers leverage connected technology more and the impact on the business deepens, however, we can expect to see greater top-down management and involvement from board level stakeholders[iv].

 

To provide a comprehensive overview of the progress and prospects of Connected Insurance, Insurance Nexus have produced the Connected Insurance Report, an in-depth study of the progress of insurance technology globally, today, and in the future.

 

As the industry begins to understand how it can exploit the possibilities of connected and digital insurance, the Connected Insurance Report has crystalized the concerns of those tasked with turning an unprecedented technological revolution into market-ready products. At first glance, one might assume that the ability to learn more about the risks they are insuring should allow both for policies to closely follow the risk over time, and secondly that the ability to gather more information about a claim will discourage fraud. The net result should therefore be greater profit for companies, and lower premiums for their customers.

 

At second glance, it is just as clear that the picture is much more complicated than that. As we talked to more and more executives, it became apparent that the industry is only just beginning to work through the practical problems it faces. Indeed, questions as basic as the best way to install a sensor in a building are still the subject of lively debate. Ultimately, the world of insurance may be next in line for the kind of creative destruction that the tsunami of digitisation had brought to IT, telecoms, media, retail, hospitality, manufacturing, financial and business services.

 

The Connected Insurance Report was researched and produced by Insurance Nexus in collaboration with the IoT Insurance Observatory. It is the first of its kind to conceive of insurance IoT holistically, as a paradigm shift necessitating changes in insurer business models, organisational structures and technology stacks. Insurance Nexus surveyed the experiences of more than 500 insurers and reinsurers to assess where they sit in the connected insurance market and to extract the challenges they face and their stories of success.

 

Along with a panel of 20 industry leaders who have been operating at the sharp end of the IoT revolution, Insurance Nexus looked at these hurdles and opportunities and pulled them apart to provide readers with the case studies with actionable insights to help guide decision-making as the industry tackles its own strategic milestones.

 

 

Tech infographic

 

[i] https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/telecom/internet/popular-internet-of-things-forecast-of-50-billion-devices-by-2020-is-outdated

[ii] https://www.accenture.com/gb-en/insight-insurance-internet-things

[iii] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-45590293

[iv] https://assets.kpmg/content/dam/kpmg/xx/pdf/2019/03/insurtech-trends-2019.pdf

What Is Life Insurance Straight Through Processing?

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By Ken Leibow – September 1, 2019

Broker World Magazine 

 

I get asked all the time: “What is life insurance straight through processing (STP)?” The answer varies because there are different perspectives based on whether you are a carrier, vendor, BGA, agent or consumer. Life insurance STP has evolved quickly because of the advancement of insurtech, with each piece contributing to the next phase (Term Ticket Model, Accelerated Underwriting—Predictive Automated Underwriting, Digital Sales Platform). So, let’s explore the different types of STP, the benefits today and the trends for the future.

 

Term Ticket Model
In the Distribution world, Straight Through Processing was defined as a Drop-Ticket or Term-Ticket during its peak years from 2011-2016—running a term insurance quote, then clicking a button to do an abbreviated eApp, and then ePolicy delivery. A term ticket is not a full eApp. The term ticket platform may be a proprietary platform like Legal & General AppAssist or a multi-carrier platform like iPipeline iGO. Basically, it involves filling out questions for most of a Part 1 and replacement information, then asking the best time to call your client. The data and pre-filled forms are sent to a call center at the carrier or a third-party service provider like ExamOne for example. The client gets a call that typically lasts 30 minutes or less. The person conducting the tele-interview asks questions to complete the Part 1 and the medical questions for the Part II of the life insurance application. The interviewer follows a reflective script. Signatures are captured for the medical authorization in some cases, and for all the relevant forms, via Voice Signature. The interviewer also schedules the Paramed exam.

 

Once the underwriter receives the lab slip from the exam, with the results from blood drawn from the client, and reviews all the necessary information captured in the interview, then they approve the case—unless the underwriter determines additional information is needed like a copy of medical records from a doctor or hospital (APS). If the case is approved as applied for, and the client has provided his or her email address and opted in for eDelivery, then a notification either goes out to the BGA, agent or client via email depending on the eDelivery workflow setup. The eDelivery process for the client is a ceremony of consenting to eDelivery, even though they already opted in, reviewing the policy, paying the balance of premium due either by credit card or EFT, and then eSigning the delivery requirements like an amendment or delivery receipt. The client then saves or prints their policy. The agent is notified, the case is placed in force, and commissions are paid. This is one example of Term Ticket STP, however each carrier has slight variations of the process described above, and different distribution channels, like direct marketers, have a modified version of a Term Ticket STP. Essentially, it’s the same model.

 

Benefits to the BGA and Agent:

  • Cases submitted in good order;
  • Handing off fulfillment to focus on sales;
  • Faster cycle time;
  • Higher placement ratio;
  • No chasing down delivery requirements—especially premiums;
  • Commissions paid faster;
  • Reduce travel costs in delivering a policy; and,
  • Seamless experience.

 

Benefits to the Carrier:

  • Cases submitted in good order;
  • Control over the fulfillment process;
  • Higher conversion rate from interview to exam;
  • Faster cycle time;
  • Higher placement ratio;
  • Ease of doing business; and,
  • Reduced costs of mailing and printing policies.

 

This article was originally published by Broker World Magazine, September 1, 2019. To read the complete article, then please click the Button below:

E-Signature Laws Provide Legal Framework For Blockchain

Brian Casey

By Brian Casey

 

Today, there is certainly much hype and hope for successful deployments of distributed ledger, or blockchain, technology especially in the cryptocurrency world. There also seems to be a general perception that there is not a clear, or even an existing legal framework for blockchain transactions, be they commercial or consumer in nature. While there are certainly specific laws that can apply to particular types of blockchain-based transactions, such as federal and state securities laws in the case of cryptocurrency initial coin offerings, many blockchainers may not realize that there is an existing legal framework that readily accommodates a broad base of blockchain transactions; these are state, and in a few cases, the federal, electronic signatures and records laws.

 

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These laws apply across many industries, including banking, structured finance, consumer finance, manufacturing and distribution of commercial and consumer goods, but, to make my points concrete, I am going to explain how to apply this framework to an insurance product given my insurance industry focus.

 

The federal electronic signature law, the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act,[1] applies only in the three states that have not adopted the model state-based electronic signature law, known as the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act.[2] ESIGN provides for reverse preemption of itself and defers to UETA.[3] Therefore, UETA, which has been adopted in 47 states, is the primary law of the land, which establishes that electronic signatures, formation of electronic contracts, electronic delivery of documents required to be delivered in writing (irrespective of whether they require a signature) and satisfaction of written record retention requirements through electronic records cannot be denied legal effect on the basis of their electronic nature. Therefore, the focus of this article is on UETA and its relationship to blockchain transactions and distributed ledger technology used to create these transactions.

 

Many insurers have relied upon UETA to implement the use of electronic signatures for new insurance policy applications and to satisfy their obligation to deliver insurance policies in written form via electronically delivered insurance policies.

 

To understand why UETA applies to blockchain created transactions, it is important to recognize what types of transactions might be effectuated thereby and the key concepts in and rules established by UETA. Blockchain enabled transactions might include the electronic signature of electronically created contracts, the electronic delivery of documents, the automatic execution of a “smart contract’s” provisions that are triggered when agreed upon third party data, or oracles, enter the blockchain. Blockchains can also serve as the electronic repository for data and records entered into them. The drafters of UETA recognized the concept of a digital asset token in 1999, stating that “[t]he technology has yet to be developed which will allow for the possession of a unique electronic token embodying the rights associated with a negotiable promissory note. Section 16’s concept of control is intended as a substitute for possession.”[4]

 

UETA is intentionally designed to accommodate the advent of future technologies. To be sure, [UETA] has been drafted to permit flexible application consistent with its purpose to validate electronic transactions. [UETA’s] provisions… validating and effectuating the employ of electronic media allow the courts to apply them to new and unforeseen technologies and practices. As time progresses, it is anticipated that what is new and unforeseen today will be commonplace tomorrow. Accordingly, this legislation is intended to set a framework for the validation of media which may be developed in the future and which demonstrate the same qualities as the electronic media contemplated and validated under this Act.[5]

 

User Authentication

Identifying and authenticating electronic signatories is not a new issue or that difficult of a challenge or process. Many businesses using online means for obtaining and receiving electronically signed records from their customers already use customer authentication procedures, such as “shared-secrets” where by a new consumer is authenticated by answering online questions which evoke personal data that would most likely only be known by the consumer (sometimes this data is sourced directly from a consumer report provided by a consumer reporting agency); furthermore, for existing customers, many businesses, especially those in the financial services and insurance industries, customer authentication is a regular business function because of privacy and anti-money laundering compliance obligations. So, the point is that most businesses using e-signature technology already get the authentication issue, and applying that in the blockchain context should be relatively simply.

 

Electronic Signatures

UETA (and ESIGN) provide that electronic contracts and other signed records cannot be denied their legal effectiveness solely because they were created by e-signatures. Thus, to the extent a contract or other document is signed by a user through an (electronic) blockchain, UETA (and ESIGN) step in to support the legality of blockchain effected e-signatures.

 

This article was originally published on June 13, 2018 by Locke Lord as a Law360 article written by Brian Casey. Click the button below to View or Download the Complete Article:

Proformex Publishes Analysis of Life Insurance Best Interest Standards

 

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Kris Beck Headshot

WRITTEN BY

Kris Beck, CEO

Proformex

 

An In-Depth Look: Best Interest Standards for Life Insurance

Where did they start, where are they now, and where are they going?  “Best interest standards” are regulations that require carriers and producers that sell life insurance to establish criteria and processes overseeing product recommendations given to retail consumers. Under best interest standard regulations, all investment recommendations given to consumers must be made with the consumer’s needs top of mind. The ultimate goal is to protect the consumer and define the ethical duties of agents and advisors selling life insurance. This paper takes a deeper look of how best interest standards have been introduced to the life insurance industry, the various moves made on the state level to legislate these standards, and the future direction of the industry.

 

Download or View the full Article click the Executive Brief Button below:

Life Insurance Companies Investing in Insurtech Accelerators

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Why are so many of the biggest players in the life insurance sector investing substantially in their own insurtech accelerators? They know that these tech companies are creating the future that will help traditional life insurers in their own transformation processes. They also know that it is simply a wise financial investment. Insurtech is one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy. Given the flexibility inherent in the startup sphere, these companies are also able to look at perennial concerns from a fresh perspective. With a host of new tools at their disposal, they can tackle problems with innovative approaches and often at minimal cost.

 

The life insurance industry as a whole has long struggled with the problem of trying to sell a product that forces people to consider their own mortality, an uncomfortable situation. However, current trends in wearables, data analytics and instant communications have given the industry a tremendous opportunity to focus on fostering wellness and quality of life. Consumers can think of their life insurer as a partner for living, rather than the last thing they want to think about.

 

The growing world of insurtech also allows smaller life insurance companies to punch above their weight. They can bypass clunky traditional systems and implement sleeker, more minimalistic software that takes advantage of new technologies in cloud computing, data analytics, AI and machine learning.  Smaller insurers can also look to insurtech firms to facilitate their adoption of the latest trends in distribution, customer service, pricing, claims and even underwriting, at a fraction of the cost of traditional software solutions.

 

You can learn more about insurtech, and meet the heavy hitters, at InsureTech Connect, September 23rd – 25th, 2019 at MGM Grand in Las Vegas. Register.

 

InsureTech Connect is the world’s largest insurtech event, offering unparalleled access to the largest and most comprehensive gathering of tech entrepreneurs, investors and insurance industry executives from across the globe. Founded by Jay Weintraub and Caribou Honig, ITC is expecting more than 7,000 attendees from 60+ countries this year. InsureTech Connect 2019, presented by Oliver Wyman, will be held September 23rd – 25th, 2019 at MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

 

 

Quantifying Cyber: How Insurance Carriers are Meeting the Challenge of Covering an Ever-Changing Risk Landscape

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With insurance companies facing an average of 113 targeted breaches a year, it can be argued that cybersecurity is one risk the insurance industry is not prepared for. Prominent breaches, such as the Premera Blue Cross and Anthem attacks, saw a combined 90 million customer records fall into the hands of nefarious actors and the subsequent damage to both customers and carriers cannot be underestimated.

 

And yet, from this growing trend, opportunities are increasing; the sector is largely untapped, with experts projecting cyber insurance premiums to rise to more than $8bn by 2020, a substantial increase from $1.87bn in 2017. Premium growth will continue to rise over the next decade as the concept of cyber insurance becomes more entrenched across the sector. For comparison, Deloitte found that US P&C premium revenues rose only 4.6% in 2017 and this was the most such premiums had risen year on year in a decade. It is clear that for the right player with the right product, huge portions of the cyber insurance market are there to be won.

 

Adapting to customers’ cyber security needs is a clear opportunity for carriers to achieve rapid growth in a sector that is otherwise at capacity. However, carriers face many challenges before they can begin to maximize the potential in covering cyber risk. Insurance Nexus spoke to a panel of senior insurance executives and cyber risk experts to discover what the landscape looks like for carriers moving into cyber coverage.

 

Access the exclusive whitepaper, Quantifying Cyber: How Insurance Carriers are Meeting the Challenges of Covering an Ever-Changing Risk Landscape, for detailed insights into:

  • Why underwriting for cyber risk poses challenges
  • The contribution made by catastrophe modeling
  • How to anticipate exposure to risk
  • The threat from quantum computing
  • The importance of customer education

 

This whitepaper was written in association with Insurance Nexus’ upcoming Cyber Insurance USA Summit 2019. The conference, which will welcome over 150 senior executives from across cyber, product, claims and business teams, will take place on November 4th and 5th, 2019, in Chicago, Illinois. For more information about this and other Insurance Nexus events, please visit the website: https://events.insurancenexus.com/cyberusa/ or contact Kamilla Rakhmat directly.

 

Contact:

Kamilla Rakhmat | Project Director

Project Director

Insurance Nexus

T: +44(0)20 7375 7523

E: kamilla.rakhmat@insurancenexus.com

The Big 3 (ACORD, DTCC, & IRI) Meet to Collaborate on Addressing the Challenges of the Industry

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On the last week of July, 2019, insurance industry technology leaders and experts from the Depository Trust Corporation (DTCC), Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) and ACORD had a meeting in New York. For many years the three organizations (ACORD, DTCC and IRI) have worked on countless initiatives that either compliment or overlap their products and services. Representatives from all three organizations do participate in each other’s working groups and committees to sync up and contribute where possible, however this is the first time in recent years that that the three organizations exclusively have met to update each other on key activities and see where they can work together moving forward.

 

Some of the attendees included Jim Quinn- Chief Technology Officer of IRI;  and from DTCC’s Insurance & Retirement Services Division: Barbara Smith – Executive Director and Jeanann Smith, Senior Product Management. ACORD who hosted the meeting had several key people participate such as Malou August – Senior Vice President of Standards & Membership, Karen Mottley – Business Architect of the Life & Annuity Program, and Yolanda Austin who is ACORD’s leading Life & Annuity Consultant.

 

ACORD provided InsurTech Express a quote signed off from leaders of all three organizations, “ACORD, DTCC and IRI met to discuss key initiatives, and identify opportunities to collaborate. Some of the initiatives we discussed were Digital Standards, Distributed Ledger Technology, New Business, Replacement Automation, and Regulation 187 efforts. The initial focus is on annuities, and we also plan to engage industry leaders throughout the broader Life community. We are excited to come together to help guide industry priorities, promote increased standards adoption, and contribute to greater successes within our industry.”  The meeting didn’t only include updating on each organization’s vision and key initiatives, but they also wanted to address the challenges the industry is experiencing today. ACORD, DTCC and IRI realize there are several opportunities where they can better collaborate.

 

The good news is that the meeting was a success! There was progress on getting alignment on issues in today’s initiatives and addressing those for the future. ACORD, DTCC and IRI do have common goals like increasing adoption and promoting standard usage. Not only did they decide to collaborate on the key initiatives mentioned above (Digital Standards, Distributed Ledger Technology, New Business, Replacement Automation and Regulation 187), but it  was agreed upon to continue the conversation and meet again, which includes taking some substantive action like proposing to write a White Paper together for providing guidance in the industry.

 

On the sales and business side of insurance and retirement services, many people don’t realize that the engine behind the seamless automation for submitting new business, paying commissions, money settlement, Inforce services, producer licensing, advocacy and education are all driven or a result of the initiatives by ACORD, DTCC, and IRI. The Big 3 working together will help with speed to market, reducing costs, growing adoption, and driving more implementations making the industry a better place.

 

About ACORD:

ACORD (Association for Cooperative Operations Research and Development) is the global standards-setting body for the insurance and related financial services industries. ACORD’s Mission: For nearly 50 years, ACORD has been a non-profit, industry-owned organization that enables the success of the global insurance industry by leveraging the flow of data and information across all insurance stakeholders through relevant and timely data standards.

 

About DTCC Insurance & Retirement Services:

DTCC’s Insurance & Retirement Services (I&RS) offers a suite of streamlined processing and compliance-driven solutions for carriers and their distribution partners — broker/dealers, banks, brokerage general agencies, independent broker/dealers and other firms — through a secure, centralized and automated infrastructure. This infrastructure enables insurance carriers and distributors to exchange information at various points throughout the annuity and life insurance processing cycle.

 

About the Insured Retirement Institute:

The Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) is the leading financial services trade association for the retirement income industry. Members represent the entire supply chain of insured retirement strategies, including Insurers, Banks, Asset Managers, Broker-Dealers, Distributors, Financial Advisors and Solution Providers. IRI provides a wealth of educational, research, advocacy, and ops & tech benefits to its members